MADIDI.COM
Home
Trips
EcoLodges
Reserves
Links
Wildlife
About Us
Bookstore
Photos
Menu

Alan
Perry

Daniel
Manzaneda

(208)
866-9617

info@
madidi.com

infomadidi@
gmail.com



Mapajo EcoLodge
Pilon Lajas Indigenous Territory
Photos | Itineraries | What does Mapajo mean? |An invitation to visit |Pilon Lajas Indigenous Territory | Mapajo's Philosophy | Location | What does Mapajo offer? |The Book Palabras Antiguas y Nuevas del Rio Quiquibey | Mosetén and Chiman | Communities | Music


Photos

Mapajo EcoLodge; Pilon Lajas Indigenous Territory (http://picasaweb.google.com/infomadidi/MapajoEcoLodge)

View all MADIDI.COM photos
(http://picasaweb.google.com/infomadidi)



Itineraries

6 Day Mapajo
Day 1 Morning: Transfer from hotel to TAM airport and flight from La Paz to Rurrenabaque. Reception at airport, Rurrenebaque, lunch. Afternoon: Transfer to the lodge, 3 hours on the Beni River, passing through the Bala Canyon, to the Quiquibey River in the Pilon Lajas Biosphere Reserve, Installation in the Mapajo Lodge. Night: Dinner and rest. Day 2 Morning: Breakfast, trek Dos Collares Trail, lunch. Afternoon: Boat trip on the Quiquibey River, Trek Las Parabas Trail. Night: Boat trip by night, observation of crocodiles, dinner and rest. Day 3 Morning: Breakfast, boat trip on the Beni River, trek Escabeche Trail, Lunch on the beach. Afternoon: Traditional camping installation, Tour of the surroundings. Night: Dinner, night walk and rest. Day 4 Morning: Breakfast, Return to lodge on the Quiquibey River with the possibility of swimming, Fishing and rest on the beach, Lunch. Afternoon: Rest. Night: Dinner, Traditional music, Rest. Day 5 Morning: Breakfast, Moseten and Tsiman cultural exchange in the community of Asuncion del Quiquibey, lunch. Afternoon: Trek the Cachichira Trail, return trip to Rurrenabaque. Night: Dinner and accommodation in hotel. Day 6 Morning: Breakfast, transfer to airport, flight from Rurrenabaque (10:30 am) to La Paz (11:30 am). Transfer to hotel in La Paz.

5 Day Mapajo
Day 1 Morning: Transfer from hotel to TAM airport and flight from La Paz to Rurrenabaque. Reception at airport, Rurrenebaque, lunch. Afternoon: Transfer to the lodge; 3 hours on the Beni River, passing through the Bala Canyon, to the Quiquibey River in the Pilon Lajas Biosphere Reserve, Installation in the Mapajo Lodge. Night: Dinner and rest. Day 2 Morning: Breakfast, tour of the Quiquibey River, lunch on the beach. Afternoon: Trek the Parabas Trail. Night: Night trip by boat, observation of crocodiles, dinner and rest. Day 3 Morning: Breakfast, trek Dos Collares Trail, lunch. Afternoon: Trek the Mapajo Trail and observation of large tree. Night: Dinner, traditional music and rest. Day 4 Morning: Breakfast, Moseten and Tsiman cultural exchange in the community of Asuncion del Quiquibey, lunch. Afternoon: Trek the Cachichira Trail, return trip to Rurrenabaque. Night: Dinner and accommodation in hotel. Day 5 Morning: Breakfast, transfer to airport, flight from Rurrenabaque (10:30 am) to La Paz (11:30 am). Transfer to hotel in La Paz.

4 Day Mapajo
Day 1 Morning: Transfer from hotel to TAM airport and flight from La Paz to Rurrenabaque. Reception at airport, Rurrenebaque, lunch. Afternoon: Transfer to the lodge, 3 hours on the Beni River, passing through the Bala Canyon, to the Quiquibey River in the Pilon Lajas Biosphere Reserve, Installation in the Mapajo Lodge. Night: Dinner and rest. Day 2 Morning: Breakfast, tour of the Quiquibey River, lunch on the beach. Afternoon: Trek the Parabas Trail. Night: Night trip by boat, observation of crocodiles, dinner, traditional music and rest. Day 3 Morning: Breakfast, Moseten and Tsiman cultural exchange in the community of Asuncion del Quiquibey, lunch. Afternoon: Trek the Cachichira Trail, return trip to Rurrenabaque. Night: Dinner and accommodation in hotel. Day 4 Morning: Breakfast, transfer to airport, flight from Rurrenabaque (10:30 am) to La Paz (11:30 am). Transfer to hotel in La Paz.


What does “Mapajo” mean?

Mapajo is a very large tree that embraces the small ones and protects them. It represents living together in harmony, and the spirit that inhabits it brings good luck.

top of page

An invitation to visit

We invite you for a unique opportunity to experience the Bolivian Amazon Rainforest. Come experience the beauty that is our home and let us share with you the richness of our Mosetén and T’simane cultures. We invite the visitor to our Moseten and Tsiman communities to participate in daily activities and learn about how we use forest elements for existing in our environment. We are MAPAJO Ecoturismo Indígena, the only community-based indigenous ecotourism enterprise offering you the opportunity to enjoy the natural reserve and indigenous territory Pilon Lajas, one of the most biodiverse areas in the world. We take you to the heart of Pilon Lajas: the Quiquibey River. Here one can experience the wonderful Amazon rainforest in its natural state, observe the many varieties of flora and fauna, discover the Mosetén and T’simane cultures, and enjoy our way of life.

top of page

Pilon Lajas Biosphere Reserve and Indigenous Territory

covers an area of 400,000 ha (1,000,000 acres) of rainforest from the Amazonian lowlands, at 300 m, to the Andean foothills, at 1600 m. Our territory is made up of twelve Chimán and Mosetén communities. Title to this Territory in the name of the communities was important for securing the space necessary for our daily activities. It was also important for ensuring that our lands are not invaded by colonization, which provokes the parceling of land and the depredation of the forest; a resource essential to our lives.

We have the custom of roaming about freely in the forest and we depend on it for our survival. Before, there was no colonization or pressure from outside. Now that there are roads, and runways for airplanes have been built, the territory is necessary for ensuring that we are owners of the land and able to protect it. In the past, it was not necessary to have ourr own Territory. The communities live in large spaces. These large spaces do not exist anymore.

top of page

Mapajo’s Philosophy

MAPAJO is fully owned and operated by the indigenous communities of the Quiquibey River. We created MAPAJO to generate income through sustainable tourism and the protect our forest, animals and way of life. All profits from MAPAJO are used to finance small community projects to improve the quality of life for our families and communities. We want you to enjoy our rainforest and cultures with all they have to offer with as minimal an impact as possible. Our approach to tourism is based on respect for our natural and cultural heritage.

top of page

Location

Mapajo EcoLodge is located on the río Quiquibey in the Pilon Lajas Biosphere Reserve and Indigenous Territory near its border with Madidi National Park. It is located just three hours by boat from Rurrenabaque and ten minutes from the indigenous community of Asunción del Quiquibey.

top of page

What does Mapajo offer?

The Mapajo Lodge and Surroundings

The Mapajo Lodge was built by us, the people of the Quiquibey River, using mostly local materials and based on our traditional style of construction. The lodge is the point of departure for arriving to the different streams and rivers, forest, mountains and communities that make up all the places to discover in our Territory.

top of page

Food and Beverage Service

The lodge has a cabin that houses the kitchen and dining room, where traditional food can be enjoyed and catered to visitors requirements. The food is prepared by a team of community members trained in the preparations of balanced meals and hygiene. Safe drinking water is provided directly from the source using a rural aqueduct.

top of page

Accomodations

The Mapajo Lodge has four cabins with shared bath, each with a capacity of two guests; a family cabin with private bath and capacity for 6 guests; and a matrimonial cabin with private bath. All cabins have a balcony, are fully furnished with beds, mosquito nets, night tables, shelves, deck chairs and hammocks.

top of page

Interpretation Center

Mapajo has an interpretation and rest center that was inspired by the “Shipas,” the traditional “Shaman” homes, where one can find information about the biological and cultural diversity of the Bolivian Amazon. The center is also equipped with a space for the exhibition of arts and crafts, a small library, maps, pictures, telescope and other equipment for nature interpretation during the tourist treks on the trails through the Territory’s interior.

top of page

Trail system

More than 20 km of trails and diverse circuits have been opened up:
- Dos Collares (2 hours)
- Las Parabas (2 ½ hours)
- Mapajo (1 hour)
- Cachichira (3 hours)
- Escabeche (circuit of 2 trails, 2 hours each)
- Quiquibey and Beni Rivers (Day and Night Trips)

top of page

The Book Palabras Antiguas y Nuevas del Río Quiquibey

We, the communities of the Quiquibey River in the Biosphere Reserve and Indigenous Territory Pilón Lajas, published a book in 2001 about our history and culture. The book, "Palabras Antiguas y Nuevas del Río Quiquibey en la Amazonia Boliviana," contains beautiful photographs of our region and communities, and includes short stories and legends as well as descriptions about our culture and personal histories by local people.

With the distribution and sale of this book, we hope to increase awareness among the greater public about the importance of our culture and the history of our peoples. The income generated through sales will permit us to establish a community fund for educational and cultural activities.

top of page

Our people, the Mosetén and Chiman,

are dispersed throughout the Bolivian Amazon in the Department of Beni and in the northern part of the Department of La Paz. Our customs and dialects are very similar and we have a relationship like brothers. There are some two hundred and eighty of us that live on the Quiquibey River in six communities. Before, we used to travel from one place to another. We were more nomadic. Now we prefer to stay here in this forest, which is an indigenous territory where there are many animals.

In other areas, there is a lot of colonization and we cannot live according to our customs given that there are many problems with the land and there are no longer forest. The soil does not produce because so many chemicals have been put in it. Here, we use the forest in a way that conserves it, which is how it has been for a long time. We grow crops on small plots, hunt, fish and gather from the forest so as to have the things that feed us.

top of page

Communities

We live in the six communities dispersed along the Quiquibey River. Asunción del Quiquibey and San Luis Chico are the two largest ones, while San Bernardo, Bisal, Corte and Gredal are comprised of a few families. In the community of Asunción del Quiquibey we are twenty-six families, there are more Moseten and five Chimán families. The first people arrived in the nineteen seventies and established themselves here. We’ve decided to stay because the soil is productive, the bush is good and has many animals. Before, we moved about more. Now it is difficult to do so because of colonization. It is better to stay here.

In San Luis Chico we are twenty-one families, primarily Chimanes. Before, we used to live deeper in the forest. We first arrived here in the nineteen eighties. We were always moving about but we always returned here. Now we stay.

top of page

Music

Our instruments are the flute, the bombo, the bombillo and the violin. We play the old-fashioned music of our ancestors and the new music as well, which is copied from other places. The flute is made from the Tacuara, which is like bamboo. The drum is made with wood from the Cedro tree and the hide of the collared peccary. The bombillo is made with flexible wood, such as the Cedro, and the hide of the brown agouti. We make the violin with wood from the Cedro and Manzana del Monte trees. We used to make the violin strings from monkey intestines but now we use fishing line of different sizes. To make the violin sound better when played, we apply the sap from the Paquillo tree to the bowstring, which is made with fine sewing thread. The custom of playing the violin comes from the Jesuits. When they left, our people searched the forest for material to make their own violins. We play music for parties. We like to celebrate and play music. The music is always accompanied by chicha. This is our way of celebrating. It is our distraction.

top of page

Home | Trips | EcoLodges | Reserves | Links | Wildlife |
About Us | Bookstore | Photos | Expanded Menu



Alan Perry | Daniel Manzaneda
(208) 866-9617 | info@madidi.com | infomadidi@gmail.com